May 18, 2013 – Saturday – NVAS: Standard 5

*Note: This is a day early because I am curious as to the comparison of a late Friday post versus a Saturday post. Any feedback? Let  me know!

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Visual Art GOALS and OBJECTIVES

National Visual Arts Standards – Standard 5
Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of the visual arts

Frank Korb

Click HERE for a look at the RUBRIC for EVALUATING WORK I have implemented in MOST of my art courses. This document follows the process of making art through a Formative and Summative, Self – Evaluation and COLLABORATIVE Critique.

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Welcome to another weekend of thinking about the 6 OVERARCHING GOALS that all students ought to work toward and focus on EVERY DAY during the year in all of their art classes. These Goals are unpacked from the National Standards for the Visual Arts so that they make more sense to the students and parents who are working with them through their art making and other art experiences. As I use goals in my classroom it OPENS THE FOLDER to learning.

The National Standards for the Visual Arts are now GOALS that are clear, measurable, observable, and understandable to the students, parents, and community. The use of goals is to keep the mind open to the idea of learning and focused on the act of learning, By combining both declarative (mind) and procedural (application) knowledge the intentional actions are focused on the combination of art theory and art making and art critiquing as well as the reflection on the close relationships.

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Standard #5: Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of the visual arts

As an art student you will demonstrate the ability to:

  • 5.1 identify the rationale behind making art

All too often the ideas behind the art is forgotten or never fully realized and the art is made because it was an assignment. Through this focus, the artists are asked to think about why they are making the art they are. Does it matter? The use of a reason in the process has helped the artists I have worked with stay focused on the work as well as taking pride in the work they are completing. It is more than just making art for art’s sake… it is for their sake and the sake of an artist’s job of communication.

  • 5.2 stand behind your criticism of art

Critiquing is SO important in the process of the art making procedure. This objective forces the artist to think about the choices they have made as well as the responses they verbalize (both in speech and in writing) and to be able to back it up with fact and experience. The novice, the uneducated, can easily throw off a “this work is terrible” or the opposite “this work is great!” The educated, the thoughtful artist / critic will have the words, facts, and personal experience to back up their thoughts. If they are critiquing others’ work, the facts and experiences are helpful… so long as the other artist is open for critique.

  • 5.3 describe meanings of artworks by analyzing
    •      5.3.1 techniques
    •      5.3.2 how they relate to history and culture

How is one using materials and techniques to make art? The Impressionists had a certain brush stroke that the German Expressionists didn’t have. A minimalist would approach a work with a very different intent and hand than a Romanticist or der Blaue Reiter. What is happening in the young artists society and culture that they can relate to the work they are creating? What are they able to pull from the annals of history that impacts their artwork? To look at and JUSTIFY the work, once again, gives the work a strngth and rationale that simply “completing an assignment” does not do.

  • 5.4 reflect on interpretations as a means for understanding and evaluating art

When a group sits down and has a conversation about the work in front of them, there are bound to be a variety of thoughts that are far different from the original intent of the artist. Is this a bad thing? When a young group of artists is able to listen to the variety of interpretations their classmates have about their work, the knowledge that their message may or may not have been communicated well can help them in the next work… or come to a realization that they need to go back and rework something in the current work in front of them.

  • 5.5 evaluate responses to works of art for communicating
    •      5.5.1 rationale
    •      5.5.2 ideas
    •      5.5.3 opinions

What was the artist trying to say? What was the impetus behind the work? Where are they deriving their ideas and thoughts from? Society, spirituality, politics… what do they hope to impress upon the viewer? As a professional, an artist should be thoughtful regarding the ideas they are trying to put out in the world. All that said, what do they think about how others are thinking about the works they are creating? One needs to put all of this is mind as they design, draw up, plan, create, and move forward with their works.

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Lastly, once you open the door to learning  you also need to close it.  During the last couple of minutes of my classes, we take time to reflect, to GENERALIZE the relationship to the goals and the day’s work / lessons onto what the students know or think they know about the world / practice of the arts.. This is the CLOSING THE FOLDER that allows the brain to settle down and pack away the learning, the experiences, until the following day.

You can find these (and more) in my Visual Arts Handbook HERE.

Thanks –

Frank

May 11, 2013 – Saturday – NVAS: Standard 4

Visual Art GOALS and OBJECTIVES

National Visual Arts Standards – Standard 4
Understanding the visual arts in relation to art history and cultures

Frank Korb

Welcome to another weekend of thinking about the 6 OVERARCHING GOALS that my  students work toward and focus on EVERY DAY during the year in all of my art classes. These standards (Goals) are modified from the National Standards for the Visual Arts so that they make more sense to the students and parents who are working with them through their art making and other art experiences. As I use GOALS in my classroom it OPENS THE FOLDER to learning.

This is the fourth in the series and the topic is how the visual arts relate to the history it took place in and the culture that surrounded it. Again, using the national standards in visual arts as the beginning, I “unpack” them so the standards know about (declarative knowledge) them and are able to demonstrate (procedural knowledge) their understanding of them. It is important to note that, when the goals are given to the students, they are restructured (a smidgen) so that they are meaningful and pertinent to the day’s activity AND make sense to the kids. This has been, and continues to be, something that is developed and worked on so that they are stronger and more meaningful to the kids.

The National Standards for the Visual Arts are now GOALS that are clear, measurable, observable, and understandable to the students, parents, and community. The use of goals is to keep the mind open to the idea of learning and focused on the act of learning, By combining both declarative (mind) and procedural (application) knowledge the intentionality is focused on the combination of art theory and art making as well as the investigating the close relationship between the two.

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Standard #4: Understanding the visual arts in relation to art history and cultures

As an art student you will demonstrate the ability to:

  • 4.1 recognize differences in historical and cultural contexts of art

Art does not happen in a bubble. Art does not come from a vacuum. The arts are born out of the historical events and societal contexts that are around them at the time. Impressionism was a reaction to Romanticism. Dada, to be overly simplified,  art that was so because the artist deemed it to be and to test the tastes of what was and was not acceptable in the world of art. None of the movements in art history were all by themselves. All things happen because of where the artists are in the world and how they are able to respond and work with what they had. Rauschenberg studied at the Black Mountain College and would never have been able to make what he did (as he essentially discovered concrete in some of his earlier works created under the stairs between his classes) had he not been where he was in the world.

  • 4.2 describe the purpose and meaning of art objects within different cultures, times, and places

It is certainly one thing to make art in a classroom because the great and mighty art teacher told you to. Why, then, did so many artists make things that nobody told them to make? What was it that drove them to create and invent the things that they did? What was the reason, the rationale that drove Picasso, Braque, and Gris to invent Cubism? What was it that the ancient Greeks were hoping to accomplish as they defined and formed the perfect specimen of human kind in their sculptures? What did the Native Americans, the artists of Asia, Russia, New Zealand  the ancients in the Caves at Lascaux  France… what were they all hoping to accomplish in the works they made?>

  • 4.3 compare relationships in visual art in terms of
    • 4.3.1 history
    • 4.3.2 aesthetics
    • 4.3.3 and culture as it relates to your own art

There is SO much more to the art than how it matches the couch and curtains in the room it is displayed. That is, for the artist, the least of their concerns. What is the relationship of the art to the history it was born from? How was “beauty” defined in 500 B.C., 400 A.D., 1500 A.D. and today? What is happening in today’s world that affects the works of art that we are able to make and stand behind? Would we have camouflage if the Cubists hadn’t broken up the picture place and displaced the flat edge of a table? Would we have the abstract architecture of Frank Ghery if the recognizable surfaces of the canvas was not broken up and changed by Wassily Kandinsky? What about the art of today? Could we look at and appreciate the work of Bill Viola if the invention of the television and the idea of performance art had not been married? What about the kids? What does the art they make have to do with them at all? How can they begin tomake art that matters to them and not art that matters to someone that is NOT them?

  • 4.4 evaluate and interpret art for relationships in
    • 4.4.1 form
    • 4.4.2 context
    • 4.4.3 meanings showing understanding of the work of various art professionals*

The fundamentals of art – Principles and Elements – Form, Balance, Repetition, Line, Color, Shape and From… all of this matters, and matters a great deal. Why is it that I have 64 crayons in my box, but I should only use the colors that have red in them? If I am creating a work of art based on the news of poverty in inner city America… why should I not use magazine pages of starving children on Africa? How are the Clement Greenberg’s, the Frida Kahlo’s, the Kasmir Malevich’s of the 21st century talking about and making works that I can relate to and find deeper meaning in?

  • 4.5 look at the qualities of art from various times and cultures to (Critique – Prezi Presentation)
    • 4.5.1 describe
    • 4.5.2 analyze
    • 4.5.3 interpret
    • 4.5.4 and judge works of art

These four aspects behind taking a word of art apart and critiquing it are essential in the development of a young (and old) artist as they are learning the ropes and deciding for themselves what they like, understand, care about, do about in the world of the arts. If we do not SLOW ourselves down enough to smell the flowers, all the tulips in all of Holland do not matter. To really get at the ideas of what art is, why art is, and if it even matters, the audience needs to approach the work of art with an open mind and a lot of questions.

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Lastly, once you open the door to learning  you also need to close it.  During the last couple of minutes of my classes, we take time to reflect, to GENERALIZE the relationship to the goals and the day’s work / lessons onto what the students know or think they know about the world / practice of the arts.. This is the CLOSING THE FOLDER that allows the brain to settle down and pack away the learning, the experiences, until the following day.

You can find these (and more) in my Visual Arts Handbook HERE.

Thanks –

Frank

May 4, 2013 – Saturday – NVAS: Standard 3

Visual Art GOALS and OBJECTIVES

National Visual Arts Standards – Standard 3
Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas

Frank Korb

As I have said in previous posts, there are 6 OVERARCHING GOALS that my  students work toward and focus on EVERY DAY during the year in all of my art classes. These standards are modified, but not “dumbed down,” from the National Standards for the Visual Arts so that they make more sense to the students and parents who are working with them through their art making and other art experiences. As I use GOALS in my classroom it OPENS THE FOLDER to learning.

This is the third in the series and the topic is choosing subject matter, symbols and ideas to create artwork about. We “unpack” so the standards are known about (declarative knowledge). It is important to note that, when the goals are given to the students, they are restructured (a smidgen) so that they are meaningful and pertinent to the day’s activity. Notice, they are not agenda items but rather bigger thinking topics.

The National Standards for the Visual Arts are now GOALS that are clear, measurable, observable, and understandable to the students, parents, and community. The use of goals is to keep the mind open to the idea of learning and focused on the act of learning, By combining both declarative (mind) and procedural (application) knowledge the intentionality is focused on the combination of art theory and art making as well as the investigating the close relationship between the two.

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Standard #3: Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas

As an art student you will demonstrate the ability to:

  • 3.1 reflect on how art differs and describe how it relates to history and cultures

Throughout the course, I work to relate the ideas that the kids are being exposed to and how they can tie it into their own culture. In addition to the work they are creating, it is important that they are able to see how art was created in different cultures and times and how that art related to the times it was from. What was happening in 1905 France that caused Henri Matisse and Andre Derain to throw away the natural colors of the subject and use arbitrary colors and thus become “Wild Beasts  or “the Fauves?” How can this all relate to what the kids might be experiencing today and how can they use their own times to reflect that feeling?

  • 3.2 apply subjects, symbols, and ideas in art and use skill to solve visual challenges

How can we use these ideas to help develop the necessary skills to become stronger artists, more dedicated artists, better thinkers? When we look at art in the classroom, specific elements and principles are looked at and focused on to help them push and challenge the basic ideas the kids oftgen have in their head. It is always nice to challenge them with “how can I figure this “proportion” issue out?” “How can I use this idea / trick / technique in another field / class?”

  • 3.3 describe the creation of images and ideas and explain why they are of value

Process versus product. Who is the one concerned with the process and who is the one concerned with the product. We are the artists and we are the ones who’s job it should be to be concerned with the process… not the product. In the past many kids would ask me “Can I be done?” they were more concerned with the product. Nowadays, the act of making art is the focus and the kids are looking more to HOW we get things done, how the colors work together, how the paper is handled, how the problems are resolved. That is the learning… the artwork is the byproduct of them learning how to make art (and lots of it).

  • 3.4 evaluate and defend the validity of sources for ideas

It is always easy to copy something from the National Geographic, but how does one come up with their own idea for an artwork? What makes it a strong idea or a weak one? Where artists come up with the ideas is a long time concern for us all. Only we, the artist, really care about how we came up with the idea and how we got the work done. More often than not the audience is more concerned with the “final product.” So, what is it that makes for quality subject matter? What was the artist trying to say? Was it successful? Does it really matter? (Thanks Ted Orland and David Bayles of Art and Fear for that one… buy your copy today!)

  • 3.5 evaluate and defend how
    •      3.5.1 subject matter
    •      3.5.2 symbols are used in art

Oh the critique. The world of art is SO MUCH MORE than just the art hanging on the wall. Writing about, thinking about, conversing about, talking, having coffee over, mumbling, grumbling, complaining, and being frustrated about the art. Standing in front of their peers and discussing the good, the bad, and the ugly and how / why / why not things happened. Writing about the process the challenged the struggles… it all goes into the process. From the critiques and reflection is where the real learning happens. Check out my classroom RUBRIC to see what I am talking about and using for collaborative feedback and grading… I love this.

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Keep in mind that once you open the door, you also need to close it.  During the last couple of minutes of my classes, we take time to reflect, to GENERALIZE the relationship to the goals and the day’s work. This is the CLOSING THE FOLDER that allows the neurons to settle down and pack away the learning, the experiences, until the following day.

You can find these (and more) in my Visual Arts Handbook HERE.

Thanks –

Frank

April 27, 2013 – Saturday – NVAS: Standard 2

Visual Art GOALS and OBJECTIVES

National Visual Arts Standards – Standard 2
Using knowledge of PRINCIPLES and FUNCTIONS

Frank Korb

As I have said in previous posts, there are 6 OVERARCHING GOALS that my  students work toward and focus on EVERY DAY during the year in all of my art classes. These standards are modified, but not “dumbed down,” from the National Standards for the Visual Arts so that they make more sense to the students and parents who are working with them through their art making and other art experiences.

AS I use GOALS in my classroom (in any classroom for that matter) the essential part of the process of the goal is that it fires up and activates the neurons in the brain and gets the artist (student, teacher, whomever) focused on the work that will be undertaken. This OPENS THE FOLDER to learning.

This is the second in the series that we will look at and “unpack” so the standards (or GOALS at this point) are known about (declarative knowledge). It is important to note that, when the goals are given to the students, they are restructured (a smidgen) so that they are meaningful and pertinent to the day’s activity. Notice, they are not agenda items but rather bigger thinking topics.

The National Standards for the Visual Arts are now GOALS that are clear, measurable, observable, and understandable to the students, parents, and community. The use of goals is to keep the mind open to the idea of learning and focused on the act of learning, By combining both declarative (mind) and procedural (application) knowledge the intentionality is focused on the combination of art theory and art making as well as the investigating the close relationship between the two.

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Standard #2: Using knowledge of PRINCIPLES and FUNCTIONS

As an art student you will demonstrate the ability to:

  • 2.1 form criticism about artworks that work to accomplish
    •      2.1.1    commercial
    •      2.1.2    personal
    •      2.1.3    communal
    •      2.1.4    or other meanings

Critiquing is an essential part of the reflection process as we make our art and work towards the development of the skills we need to make successful art. The use of the critique allows artists to be self-reflective while also being able to be critical (constructively hopefully) to their fellow artists (in the classroom, around the coffee shop table, via the internet and collaborative discussions.

  • 2.2 evaluate the effectiveness of artworks

What is working and what is not. The thought about the use of materials, communication of messages, asking deeper questions about the successful and unsuccessful aspects – with deliberate and specific parts of the work in mind.

  • 2.3 create artworks that solve visual challenges

By the simple act of making marks, the challenges and struggles that MAKING art can allow for solutions to be dealt with.

  • 2.4 compare different points of view regarding composition and meaning in artwork

This is great to hear when one has a group of kids / artists. Getting more feedback (formative and summative) from more than one person is great. It is also a great thing for the kids to hear from their classmates and NOT JUST FROM THE TEACHER!

  • 2.5 defend personal evaluations

Being able to justify and stand behind the works through the use of ART VOCABULARY is a great way to help the artist learn to SPEAK ABOUT THEIR ART. I have heard MANY BAD discussions and I hope that my students walk out with the skills and confidence to be public speakers who can voice their opinions and back them up with evidence.

  • 2.6 create multiple solutions to visual challenges that show understanding in relationships between composition and meaning of artwork

Here is the place that making a lot of work is key. 10 sketches, 3 drawing, 7 sculptures, 100 bowls… all in the name of becoming stronger int he solution of the challenges that are at hand. Relationships, forms, balance… you name it and all of these will be realized (and more) as more and more art is made.

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Keep in mind that once you open the door, you also need to close it.  During the last couple of minutes of my classes, we take time to reflect, to GENERALIZE the relationship to the goals and the day’s work. This is the CLOSING THE FOLDER that allows the neurons to settle down and pack away the learning, the experiences, until the following day.

You can find these (and more) in my Visual Arts Handbook HERE.

Thanks –

Frank

March 8, 2013 – FRIDAY!

RePost – Retweet – Share – Make me the JUSTIN BIEBER of Lesson Planning and GOAL Setting! Follow my page DAILY in your e-mails to see what we are up to in art class! Be inspired to create your own GOALS and ARTWORKS! Share my page with  ALL of your world!

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Art Foundations 2D: 2 Point Perspective – RULES OF THUMB – QUIZ, Doors and Windows – WRAP up the NEGATIVE SPACE PAINTING.

Frank Ghery and his architectural wonderment – On the Simpsons.

GOALS:

  1. 1.4 create, and solve 2 Point Perspective Roof / sidewalks / windows and doors using 1.4.1 analysis (breaking up the subject matter to basic elements).

How important is it to remember the rules of thumb as you are drawing your cubes, doors, and windows? What challenges did you have in the process of the drawing?

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Drawing: BEGIN THE DRAWING! What did you do to make your COMPOSITION interesting? Please make use of the WORKSHEET (page 17 and 18 of the Art Department Handbook).

How would you categorize this drawing’s composition? Yes, it is OPEN… but what else?

GOALS:

  1. (1.2) Create art that demonstrates an understanding of how your ideas relate to materials, techniques and process.

How have you begun the final drawing? What format of composition is YOUR final drawing? How have you used the ideas from the worksheet to make sure you are AWARE of the composition?

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AP Studio Art: Work on the Breath and Concentration ideas and Art Works. Remember that you have NEXT week and then the work is DUE on the FOLLOWING Monday. How are you about the EDITING of your images. Remember that you need to, for your own records and good practice, make 2 versions of the final artwork. 300 dpi and 72 dpi – each one for a different reason.

How does YOUR artwork stand out in comparison to the artworks that are around you? What makes your newest piece (idea) stand out from the rest of your artworks?

GOALS:

  1. 3.5 evaluate and defend how 3.5.1 subject matter 3.5.2 symbols are used in art
  2. 4.4 evaluate and interpret your art in your time for relationships in 4.4.1 form 4.4.2 context (what might this mean as we look at ALL of the class work?)

Breadth Work – “Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome while trying to succeed.”

 

How difficult is it for you to continue moving forward with your next artwork? What challenges did you have yesterday with the editing process yesterday? How many images have you uploaded to the AP website? What PORTFOLIO are you going to present?

March 6, 2013 – Wednesday

Follow my page DAILY in your e-mails to see what we are up to in art class! Be inspired to create your own GOALS and ARTWORKS! Share my page with  ALL of your world! Post – Retweet – Share – Make me the JUSTIN BIEBER of Lesson Planning and GOAL Setting!

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Art Club – Set Painting, Tuesday and Wednesday from 5:30 – 8:30. Join us and bring a friend! Be part of all the fine arts at WUHS!

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Open Studio THIS SATURDAY! See Mr. Roberts to sign up and get a permission slip if you haven’t already!

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Art Foundations 2D: Positive Negative Space Drawing / Painting

My COWS in Positive and negative space! How do I play with the positive and negative space?

GOALS:

  1. 1.2 create art that demonstrates an understanding of how your ideas relate to the 1.2.3 and processes you use.

What was the hardest part of finding the NEGATIVE space in the composition? What do you think will help you as you consider how negative space is used in your artworks? Why is the background an important part of any composition? PAIR / SHARE with a friend and discuss this topic – LOUDLY!

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Drawing: Paper Open Compositions with TEXTURE on Brown Craft Paper

Check out the SHAPES that this artist used to create this paper bag painting! How cool! Contrasts with the highlights and shadows – AWESOME!

GOALS:

  1. Create art that demonstrates an understanding of how your ideas relate to materials, techniques and process.

Pair / Share – self – evaluation of the day – comments section of the goal sheet – what is strong with your partner’s composition that will make it interesting to look at? What is a weakness in the composition that they may want to consider as they move forward?

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AP Studio Art: Computer Lab – Editing and Uploading Photographs of work.

Breadth Work – “Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome while trying to succeed.”

– Booker T. Washington

The above is your Breadth starting point! Where you take it from here is up to you.

And the winner is… TBA on Thursday… Work day… Friday… Back to the computer lab.

Let’s Get to EDITING!

GOALS: 21st Century Thinking

  1. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making: Use technological skills to solve problems, and make informed decisions using digital images and editing tools.

What was the problem that you had today with the editing of the images? Can you do this on your own? Do we need one more day in the lab to work?

March 5, 2013 – Tuesday

Art Club – Set Painting, Tuesday and Wedesday from 5:30 – 8:30. Join us and bring a friend! Be part of all the fine arts at WUHS!

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“Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome while trying to succeed.”

– Booker T. Washington

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Art Foundations: Positive and Negative Space Drawings, 2 Point Perspective – the Cube – Review notes from Chapter 5.

Positive / Negative Space Drawing and Painting.

GOALS:

  1. 1.2 create art that demonstrates an understanding of how your ideas relate to the 1.2.3 processes you use
  2. 2.3 create artworks that solve visual challenges

What was the MOST CHALLENGING aspect of using the NEGATIVE space to create your artwork for today? Why do you think that being able to SEE the negative space is important in an observational drawing?

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Drawing: Begin work on texture drawings – paper bag and plastic bag drawings – OPEN compositions.

Notice the texture? Is this an OPEN or CLOSED composition?

GOALS:

  1. (1.2) Create art that demonstrates an understanding of how your ideas relate to materials, techniques and process.

What techniques / understanding from our last projects in VALUE do you think you can use top make this next drawing OUTSTANDING? What did you learn that will make your OPEN compositions really strong?

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AP Studio Art: Work on coming up with ideas for the next BREADTH work and you concentration works… DO NOT WAIT until the few days before the second week to get started on either… work on both ALWAYS.

What can you do with your ideas? How cool is this sketchbook?

GOALS:

  1. 2.6 create multiple solutions to visual challenges that show understanding in relationships between composition and meaning of artwork

How do you make plans for the work you are planning? What is holding you back from creating outstanding works in the first place? Are you unsure, scared, lazy, apathetic or SOARING to new heights?

 

March 4, 2013 – Monday

Art Club – Set Painting, Tuesday and Wedesday from 5:30 – 8:30. Join us and bring a friend! Be part of all the fine arts at WUHS!
From Frank Korb’s ABC’s of Art 2013:

“L is for Lifelong Learning – What does it take to be an artist? This is a question that many colleges and universities fail to provide a solid answer for. Opportunities abound as one learns what it is to juggle the time, management, resources, artworks, and all the other things that are part of a successful artist (professional and students alike).”

– Frank Korb

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Art Foundations: Perspective – Linear and NON-Linear. Chapter 5 ArtTalk Textbook, Drawing and Discussion of perspective ideas. How do you see SPACE?

Black and white negative space empty Black and white negative space filled

GOALS:

  1. 1.4 create, define, and solve visual challenges using 1.4.1 analysis (breaking up the artwork / subject matter to basic elements)

 Review with neighbors the RULES of THUMB and discuss the Differences in linear and non-linear perspective.

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Drawing – Final day to TOUCH up and FIX any visual challenges your portrait has.

Look “Close” and see how it all comes together! How’s your drawing?

GOALS:

  1. 1.4 create, define, and solve visual challenges using 1.4.2 synthesis (put all the parts of a work together to form a whole)

What did you take away from the critique last week? How did you use that information to make your drawing more successful today? Was the extended work time worthwhile to resolve the challenges you had? Write down what you have taken from the crit.

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AP Studio ArtCRITIQUE – Who gets voted off?

Robert Smithson’s “Spiral Jetty,” one of the most famous works of earth art. GETTY EDUCATIONAL IMAGE – Copyright Getty Education.

Goals:

  1. PEER-evaluate the effectiveness of artworks A: What have you been challenged with from the past two weeks worth of making art.

What were the biggest impressions you had from the classmate’s works? What were the most difficult things you felt as you presented your work? Conversation between classmates about the 2 questions for your exam. How does this work relate to your concentration?

February 28, 2013 – Thursday (or is it Friday?)

There is only one day left, always starting over; it is given to us at dawn and taken away from us at dusk.”

— Jean-Paul Sartre – http://goalhabits.com/author/paul456/

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Art Foundations: Perspective – what is it and how do you understand the process of one and two point perspective? Draw out your understanding of the process and your work. Filippo Brunelleschi and the Re-Invention of linear perspective.

“The Nuptials of the Holy Virgin” Raphael, 1504

GOALS:

  1. 1.4.1 analysis (breaking up the artwork / subject matter to basic elements).
  2. 6.2 compare characteristics of the visual arts and other disciplines from history or movements (Renaissance).

What were your MAJOR mistakes / missteps in the use of one point perspective? What is it that you remember from your past experiences with perspective?

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Drawing: ORAL CRITIQUE – Day 3.

How have you demonstrated YOUR self-reflection? Does this look like a good use of time? YES!

What was beneficial for you in the process of the critique? WHY are some NOT speaking? Hmm…..

GOALS: Be prepared for this long one… I have GREAT expectations from each and every one of you!

  1. 5.2 Gather up the courage to talk about the work in front of you, and stand behind your criticism of art

What is it you take away from the critique of others work? Write down ONE REALLY SOLID bit of information that stands out in your head! Share this with your classmate. THIS IS IMPORTANT!

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AP Studio Art: Last day to work in class… Who won Work of Art? Peregrine the girl from the park? Hipster Steve? Maybe it was Abdi the educator… AP STUDIO ART: Final Minutes of Work of Art… Who will be voted off? Work of Art: The Next Great Artist Season 1

Andy Goldsworthy – Take a look at how HE uses the objects from nature and makes quality and thoughtful artworks. How can you approach – how HAVE you approached the same ideas.

GOALS:

  1. What is your personal GOAL for the day?
  2. 5.4 reflect on interpretations as a means for understanding and evaluating art

Ok all… what have you got to continue and finish? What are your plans for the next work? What is holding you back from developing your work and moving it forward?

February 27, 2013 – Wednesday

FOLLOW and SHARE – Can you set GOALS for your own DAY to DAY? These are the roadmaps for the students in my classes.

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Art Foundations: Perspective – what is it and how do you understand the process of one and two point perspective? Draw out your understanding of the process and your work. Filippo Brunelleschi and the Re-Invention of linear perspective.

Perspective was invented in the Renaissance of Art (Late 1400’s – 1700).

GOALS:

  1. 1.4.1 analysis (breaking up the artwork / subject matter to basic elements).
  2. 6.2 compare characteristics of the visual arts and other disciplines from history or movements (Renaissance).

What were your MAJOR mistakes / missteps in the use of one point perspective? What is it that you remember from your past experiences with perspective?

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Drawing: ORAL CRITIQUE – Day 2.

How have you demonstrated YOUR self-reflection? Does this look like a good use of time? YES!
How have you demonstrated YOUR self-reflection? Does this look like a good use of time? YES!

GOALS: Be prepared for this long one… I have GREAT expectations from each and every one of you!

  1. 5.2 SPEAK about the work you see in front of you, gather up the courage to talk about the work in front of you, and stand behind your criticism of art

What is it you take away from the critique of others work? Write down ONE REALLY SOLID bitof information that stands out in your head! Share this with your classmate. THIS IS IMPORTANT!

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AP Studio Art: Yesterday – I asked you to come up with your own GOAL. What is a GOAL that you have for the day for yourself. This is not a TASK or AGENDA item… Sit back and think about the Goals we have written for the past year. What is a GOAL that you can modify and make pertinent to your work – your progress – your desires to learn more or improve on? Write this out and make it work.

Andy Goldsworthy – Another work by him… Let’s take a look at his website!

GOALS:

  1. 3.2 apply subjects, symbols, and ideas in art and use skill to solve visual challenges
  2. What is YOUR goal? Rewrite a National Visual Arts Standard to make it particular to your work. DO IT!

So… report to Mr. Korb what your PERSONAL GOAL was for the day, what category (1 – 6 in the NVAS did it come from) and how did you modify it to make it your own?